Bulgarian Journal of Agricultural Science
Array ( [session_started] => 1674885782 [LANGUAGE] => EN [LEPTON_SESSION] => 1 )
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CO2 evolution during spring wheat growth under no-till and conventional tillage systems in the North American Great Plains regions
R. Kocyigit, C. W. Rice
Abstract: The soil surface CO2 flux is the second largest flux in the terrestrial carbon budget after photosynthesis. Plant root and microbial respiration produce CO2 in soils, which are important components of the global C cycle. This study determined the amount of CO2 released during spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) growth under no-till (NT) and conventional tillage (CT) systems. This experiment was conducted at Kansas State University North Agronomy Farm, Manhattan, KS, on a Kennebec silt loam. This study site was previously under dry land continuous corn production with NT and CT for more than 10 years. Spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was planted with two tillage systems (NT and CT) as four replicates in March. Surface CO2 flux was measured weekly during plant growth. Soil water content at the surface (5 cm) tended to be greater in NT and decreased from planting to harvest. Soil microbial activity at the surface was usually higher in NT and decreased from planting to harvest, while activity was constant in the deeper depths. The higher microbial activity at the surface of NT occurred after 60 days of planting where soil water content was the most limiting factor on microbial activity. Soil CO2 flux varied in response to changes in soil water content and the variation and magnitude of the increase was greater at higher soil water contents. Conventional tillage released 20% more CO2 to the atmosphere compare to NT after 10 years in the North American Great Plains Regions.
Keywords: CO2 flux; conventional tillage; No-till; wheat
Date published: 2019-10-16
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